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85 éléments trouvés

  • JOB // F.A.G. | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... LAUNDRY LOOPS (JOB) ​ IV SOLDIER'S F.A.G. (FEMINIST ART GROUP) PANOPLY PERFORMANCE LABORATORY ​ NOVEMBER 3, 2016 (Lorene Bouboushian, IV Castellanos, Amanda Hunt, Kaia Gilje, Nina Isabelle) Photos: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle 1/2

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Abstract Painting // 2017

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... PAINTINGS 2017 1-2017 - 43.50 x 62.25 Acrylic on Canvas 43.50 x 62.25 2017 2-2017 43.50 x 62.25 Acrylic on Canvas 43.50 x 62.25 2017 3-2017 - 43.50 x 62.25 Acrylic on Canvas 43.50 x 62.25 2017 Paintings in the studio Paintings in the studio In January 2017 I began an investigation of addition and subtraction in relationship to concepts of minimalism and maximalism which looked at birth and death. I built and stretched three 44" x 63" canvases and then used a four-inch wide brush to drag six colors sequentially across the surface of the canvas. With the birth of each additional color came the death of a portion or the previous colors, shapes, and spaces. At the time, I was reading about the seventeenth-century deathbed performances outlined in books intended to teach people how to "Pass away in a dignified and Christian fashion," a pre-death technique presented in several mid fifteenth century books referencing The Ars moriendi, ("The Art of Dying") a practice intended to perfect the performance of dying, or- as I was thinking of it in this case, the subtraction of life. Do foundational systems of math stem from our perception of life and death, where birth is addition and death subtraction?

  • Ft. Tilden / Temporary Ungovernable Zone / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... FAMILY SOUNDS THE UNGOVERNABLE ZONE ​ FORT TILDEN ​ ANARKO ART LAB AND ARTI NYC ​ Nina A. Isabelle / The Ungovernable Zone at Fort Tilden Beach / NYC Fort Tilden is a defunct United States Military base now listed as NYC accessible ruins along the coast in Queens. ​ As an inquiry into motherhood, "Family Sounds" involved a site-responsive approach to the superimposition of an internal childhood landscape onto the defunct Ft. Tilden military base along with self-reflexive research referencing quantum nonlocality, interpretive movement, and the manipulation of physical material to align intention with action as evolved ritual. To start, I visited my childhood home in central Pennsylvania and collected audio samples like gunshots, piano, flute, and conversation. I also collected materials from an old family barn such as safety nets, camouflage burlap, industrial Velcro, and vinyl pieces. I used these materials to construct a giant robe and from the audio samples I melded a cacophonic multilayered soundscape as a way to create a tethered telepathic multigenerational connection. During the performance I blinded myself under the giant robe and bent my psyche into the constructed auditory and kinesthetic dimensions where I psychically postscribed childhood memories as a way to explore motherhood. One challenge of working this way is that documentation and integration of unlanguageable data uncovered along the way becomes difficult as perceptions expand beyond the framework of linear languages. ​ PHOTOS BY JAIME ROSENFELD JULY 8, 2017

  • PIANO PORTRAITS | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... PIANO PORTRAITS ​ By Linda Mary Montano with Nina Isabelle, & Jennifer Zackin HiLo Catskill, NY February 11, 2018 ​ During these dangerous / confusing / armageddonned times, we are all looking for connection, understanding and warmth. The three of us are committed to providing public art medicine. ART=LIFE=ART. For our PIANO PORTRAITS event at HiLo, we invite audience member-collaborators to sit in a chair on stage to receive a public art healing. Linda Mary Montano will improvise your piano portrait, Nina Isabelle will interpret you through action / movement, and Jennifer Zackin will macrame. Using knots and rope, sunglasses, costumes, blindfolds, action, movement, and sound, we will publicly heal ourselves and you. ART HEALS! ​ Photos by Adolfo Ibanez Ayerve and Carrie Dashow ​ Piano Portraits at HiLo Piano Portraits at HiLo with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Adolfo Ibanez Ayerve Piano Portraits at HiLo Piano Portraits at HiLo with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Adolfo Ibanez Ayerve Piano Portraits at HiLo Piano Portraits at HiLo with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Adolfo Ibanez Ayerve Piano Portraits at HiLo Piano Portraits at HiLo with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Adolfo Ibanez Ayerve Piano Portraits at HiLo Piano Portraits at HiLo with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Adolfo Ibanez Ayerve Piano Portraits at HiLoa_3 Piano Portraits at HiLo with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Adolfo Ibanez Ayerve Piano Portraits at HiLo Piano Portraits at HiLo with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Adolfo Ibanez Ayerve Piano Portraits at HiLo Piano Portraits at HiLo with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Adolfo Ibanez Ayerve Piano Portraits at HiLo Piano Portraits at HiLo with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Adolfo Ibanez Ayerve Piano Portraits at HiLo Piano Portraits at HiLo with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Adolfo Ibanez Ayerve LINDA MARY MONTANO is a seminal figure in contemporary feminist performance art and her work since the mid 1960s has been critical in the development of video by, for, and about women. Attempting to dissolve the boundaries between art and life, Montano continues to actively explore her art/life through shared experience, role adoption, and intricate life altering ceremonies, some of which last for seven or more years. Her artwork is starkly autobiographical and often concerned with personal and spiritual transformation. Montano’s influence is wide ranging – she has been featured at museums including The New Museum in New York, MOCA San Francisco and the ICA in London. www.lindamontano.com NINA ISABELLE is a process-based multidisciplinary artist working with action and perception. She works to deconstruct sensory input to the extent that meaning becomes shifted and interpretations become a phenomena of psychic imprint. By incorporating physical movement, modified technology, art and non-art objects, her work builds systems of action designed to intuit site-specific information- tethering the collective, personal, and regional relative narratives that drive the performance space machine toward trajectories of new perception, belief, and possibilities. Referencing the inability of communication which is used to visualize reality, the failure of dialogue, the dissonance between form and content, as well as the shortcomings of literal language, Isabelle pushes material and information past the point of recognition in a way that forces a shift in meaning, revealing new information that can transform and challenge the limits of material, perception, and belief. Her work has been exhibited at The San Diego Art Institute, The Bangkok Underground Film Festival, HiLo Catskill, the CICA Museum in South Korea, and most recently, The Mothership in Woodstock, NY. www.ninaisabelle.com JENNIFER ZACKIN has been integrating public art, sculpture, installation, performance, collaboration, ceremony, photography, video, collage and drawing into acts of reverence and reciprocity for the past 14 years. Whether wrapping trees in patterns of brightly colored rope, growing medicinal herbs in a public garden for public use, offering large masses of rose petals to oceans and lakes, creating absorbent tentacles ("hair booms") out of salvaged materials to aid in the clean-up efforts of toxic spills, Zackin seeks to engage and create community in her process, bringing art and ritual into everyday life. Every act is an exploration of exchange, communion, performance, skill-sharing and mark-making. Writing in a cataloque essay about her work Lori Waxman states; “Jennifer Zackin has worked with Rose Petals, Little Plastic Cowboys, pre-Columbian symbols, bright handmade pom-poms, cheap mass-produced posters, coca leaves, and her grandfathers old Super-8 home movies. How she weaves them into rhythmic, often meditative forms depends in great part on the underlying pattern that she is able to detect and orchestrate among her diverse materials.” Her work has been exhibited in national and international museums, including the Whitney Museum of American Art NY, Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art CT, Spertus Museum - Chicago IL, Rose Museum MA, the Wexner Center for the Arts OH, Contemporary Art Museum - Houston TX, The Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Høvikodden - Norway, Institute of Contemporary Art - Boston MA and the Zacheta National Art Gallery - Warsaw, Poland. Commissions include Governors Island NYC with LMCC, Katonah Art Museum NY, Socrates Sculpture Park LIC - Queens NY and the Berkshire Botanical Gardens - Stockbridge, MA. She is the recipient of fellowships and residencies, including Factory Direct at Pinchbeck Rose Farm, Art Omi, Atlantic Center for the Arts and the Skowhegan School for Painting and Sculpture. www.jenniferzackin.com Event photo: Carrie Dashow

  • CZONG INSTITUTE / ARTISTS & LOCATION | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ARTIST & LOCATION CZONG INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART GIMPO, KOREA October 2016 ​ CICA MUSEUM ​

  • F.A.G at OLD GLENFORD CHURCH | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... FEMINIST ART GROUP (F.A.G) HURLEY, NY ​ SEPTEMBER 1-4, 2017 ​ ​ THE OLD GLENFORD CHURCH STUDIO IV Castellanos, Amanda Hunt, Miette, Anya Liftig, Elizabeth Lamb, Jodie Lyn Kee Chow, Lorene Baboushian, Valerie Sharp, Kate Hamberger, Linda Montano, Ernest Goodmaw, Jennifer Zackin, Clara Diamond, Nina Isabelle ​ Out of gallery

  • Multidisciplinary Artist | New York | Nina A. Isabelle

    Nina Isabelle HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... Addition Equals Subtraction, 43.50 x 62.25, house paint and flashe on canvas, 2017 Nina A Isabelle performing in Temporary Ungovernable Zone for Anarko Art Lab at Ft. Tilden, NYC. Photo by Jaime Rosenfeld RECENT / CURRENT / UPCOMING -PSYCHIC SELF-DEFENSE Sculpture, Installation, & Demonstration at Art/Life Kingston, May 1st - 29th, 2021 -Imagined Performances read by IV Castellanos at Para\\el Performance Space, Brooklyn, NY, February 12, 202 1 - Kerry Santullo interviews Nina Isabelle for NYC Children's Museum of Art "Meet The Makers ," October 21, 2020 -Spheres of Perception & Value, Virtual Presentation, Hynes Institute for Entrepreneurship & Innovation at Iona College , September 21, 2020 -Video Manifestation System User Interface Lecture and Presentation , Grace Exhibition Space, NYC , May 1, 2020 -Superfund Revisioning Project Lecture, Grace Exhibition Space, NYC . May 15, 2020 -EQUINOX , An Emergency of Joy, March 19, 2020 -The Ear , Brooklyn, NY, August 23, 2019 -Remarkable New Locations - Nye Ffarrabas & Nina Isabelle, CX Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT, May 18th - June 15th, 2019 - PARALLEL -104 Meserole Street, Brooklyn NY, Saturday, March 23rd,2019- 7:PM -documentation discussion panel with LiVEART.US featuring Emergency INDEX at Queens Museum , February 17, 2019 2:00-5:00 -Emp athy Blinders by David Ian Bellows/Griess with Nina Isabelle & Elizabeth Lamb, Brooklyn Arts Media , December 4-18, 2018 -As Far As The Hart Can See / In Honor of , The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts , NYC, October 20th, 2018 -actLife , Linda Mary Montano, Nye Ffarrabas, Cai Xi, Nina Isabelle, Jennifer Zackin, Lee Xi & Sharon Myers, CX Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT, August 24 -Healing + Arts / Radical Domesticity, Movement Metaphors Workshop, Kingston, NY, August 24, 2018 -NO NUDES NO SUNSETS , August 11 - September 22, 2018, Green County Council on the Arts , Catskill, NY -Whistle Portraits, Linda Montano & Nina Isabelle, Secret City Art Revival, Woodstock, NY, July 28 - DRAMATIC OBJECT MAKING / EMPATHY BLINDERS with Elizabeth Lamb & David Ian Bellows Griess, THREE PHASE , Sept.1, 2018, Stone Ridge, NY - WE CAN'T TELL WHAT WE'RE DOING, HiLo , July 20, 2018 - August 26, 2018, Catskill, NY -Whistle Portraits , Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle & Jennifer Zackin, HiLo, Catskill, NY June 10, 2018 -ANIMALIA , Anarchist Art Festival, Judson Memorial Church, NYC, June 8 2018 -GUTTER HANGER w/ Lorene Bouboushian & Friends, THREE PHASE , 1:PM-DARK, May 27, 2018, Stone Ridge, NY - EMBODYING THE OUTER BODIES: a demonstration of low-level energetic vacuum form technologies 7:PM, May 24, 2018, PPL , Brooklyn, NY - Citizen Participation: Diagrams & Directives , Feminist Art Group, www.bulletspace.org , May 6, 2018, NYC -Hymn Warp Transducer at Paul McMahon' s Bedstock Exhibit, 9 Herkimer Place, Brooklyn, NY, April 15, 2018 -New Genres at Living Arts in Tulsa,OK , March 2-3, 2018 -MUSCULAR BONDING at M.A.R.S.H. (Materializing and Activating Radical Social Habitus)- Feb 15 - March 5, St. Louis, MO -The Video Manifestation System released by Human Trash Dump - February 26, 2018 -PIANO PORTRAITS By Linda Mary Montano with Nina Isabelle, & Jennifer Zackin at HiLo , Catskill, NY, Feb. 11, 2018 -BEAST CONJURING by Nina Isabelle , The Mothership , Woodstock, NY, Jan16-21, 2018 http://paulmcmahon.tv/mothership -MKUVM , Human Trash Dump, November 27, 2017 https://archive.org/details/htdc002 -The Bedroom , 4th Iteration by The Women Artist Team, Holland Tunnel Gallery , Brooklyn, NY , October 20- November 12 -Patricia Field's International Art / Fashion Show , Joe's Garage, October 6, 2017, Catskill, NY www.greenearts.org -CENTENNIAL:SHE , Greene County Council on the Arts, October 7 - November 11, 2017 - The Shirt Factory Centennial Celebration- Performance / Open Studio , Kingston, NY, September 16, 2017 -F.A.G. Slumber Party , Nina's House & Yard Studio, Hurley, NY September 4-6, 2017 - We Are The Secret Garden: An Evening of Performance, Kingston, NY September 26, 2017 - The Bedroom , The Women Artist Team at NA Gallery, Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea, July 23- Aug. 7, 201 7 -Just Situations , Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY, July 23, 2017 https://justsituations.wordpress.com -Temporary Ungovernable Zone , Anarcho Art Lab / ARTINYC, Ft. Tilden, NY July 8, 2017 -Experimental Archery Workshop , Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY, June 10, 2017 http://www.rosekill.com - Mothering , Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY, June 3, 2017 http://www.rosekill.com/ - N Y C Anarchist Performance Art Festival #11 , The Judson Memorial Church , NYC, May 12, 2017 -The Fabric Of Women's Space-Time , The Lace Mill Gallery, Kingsotn, NY, May 13, 2017 - UNITY , The Lace Mill Gallery, Kingston, N, May 6-13, 2017 -The Unstitute's Projection Room ,Catalunya, Spain, August 2017, http://www.theunstitute.org/Projection.Room.html - STAGES , Performance by Clara Diamond with Valerie Sharp & Nina Isabelle, GREENKILL , APRIL 15, 2017 -P R O P E R T Y , R O M A N S U S A N / RPWRHS, CHICACO, IL, APRIL 1-30, 2017, www.romansusan.org - Bangkok Underground Film Festival , Bridge Art Space, Bangkok, Thailand, March 4-12, 2017 -SHORTCUT TO HELL , January 22, 2017, Otion Front Studio, Brooklyn, NY www.otionfront.com -HiLo Art , April 2017, Catskill, NY https://www.hilocatskill.com -EotW (Embarrassed Of The Whole) February 4, 2017, Panoply Lab, Brooklyn, NY http://www.panoplylab.org -Mock The Chasm, November 12, 2016, Art/Life Institute Kingston, NY http://www.artlifekingston.com/ -JOB /// IV Soldier's Feminist Art Group at Panoply Performance Lab, Brooklyn, NY -San Diego Art Institute - The Dead Are Not Quiet , San Diego, CA October 1-31 -Animal Maximalism , Green Kill, Kingston, NY, October 1-15 www.greenkill.org -POLITRICKS: Theories & Other Conspiracies , October 14, Ellipsis Art, Philadelphia, PA -Artist and Location , September 23-October 9, Czong Institute For Contemporary Art, Gimpo Korea, www.cicamuseum.com -Jurnquist Coloring Book Show , September 24, Studio Fidlär, Alexanderplatz, Berlin Out of gallery

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Abstract Painting // 2014

    Nina Isabelle HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... PAINTINGS 2015 60-2015, 22x30 60-2015, 22x30 59-2015, 22x30 59-2015, 22x30 58-2015 gouache, tempera, spray paint, acrylic on paper, 42x30 57-2015 gouache, tempera, spray paint, acrylic on paper, 42x30 frontalis.jpg Frontalis, 44x36, tempera on paper Go to link 56-201549_n gouache, tempera, spray paint, acrylic on paper, 42x30 55-2015 gouache, tempera, spray paint, acrylic on paper, 42x30 54-2015 gouache, tempera, spray paint, pencil on paper, 22x30 53-2015 gouache, tempera, spray paint, pencil on paper, 22x30 52-2015.jpg 52-2015, 24x30, oil & spray paint on canvas 51-2015.jpg 51-2015, 24x30, oil & spray paint on canvas 50-2015.jpg 50-2015, 24x30, oil & spray paint on canvas 49-2015.jpg 49-2015, 60x60, oil & spray paint on canvas 48-2015.jpg 48-2015, 72x72, oil & spray paint, brick twine, on canvas 47-2015.jpg 47-2015 87x87 46-2015.jpg 46-2015, 54x45, oil & spray paint on canvas 45-2015.jpg 45-2015, 54x45, oil & spray paint on canvas 44-2015.jpg 44-2015, oil, pastel, spray paint on canvas,, 54x45 43-2015-web.jpg 22x30, oil & spray paint on prepared paper occipital tempera on paper, 44x36 42-2015-web.jpg 22x30, oil & spray paint on prepared paper 41-2015-web.jpg 22x30, oil & spray paint on prepared paper 40-2015-web.jpg 22x30, oil & spray paint on prepared paper 39-2015-web.jpg 22x30, oil & spray paint on prepared paper 38-2015-2-web.jpg 22x30, oil & spray paint on prepared paper 37-2015-web.jpg 22x30, oil & spray paint on prepared paper hip.jpg Hip, 44x36, tempera on paper Go to link 36-2015-web.jpg oil & spray paint on canvas 32-2015 copy.jpg 24x24, oil & spray paint on masonite, 2015 30-2015 copy.jpg 24x24, oil & spray paint on masonite, 2015 35-2015 copy.jpg 22x30, oil & spray paint on masonite, 2015 34-2015 copy.jpg 24x24, oil & spray paint on masonite, 2015 33-2015 copy.jpg 24x24, oil & spray paint on masonite, 2015 31-2015 copy.jpg 29-2015-web.jpg lungs.jpg Lungs, 44x36, tempera on paper Go to link 28-2015 copy.jpg 40x18, oil & spray paint on masonite, 2015 27-2015 36x36, oil & spray paint on canvas, 2015 26-2015 36x36, oil & spray paint on canvas, 2015 25-2015 36x36, oil & spray paint on canvas, 2015 24-2015 48x48, oil on canvas, 2015 23-2015 48x48, oil on canvas, 2015 22-2015 48x48, oil on canvas, 2015 13-2015 18x24, oil & spray paint on masonite, 2015 21-2015 32x48, oil & spray paint on masonite 20-2015 36x36, oil & spray paint on canvas, 2015 19-2015 36x36, oil & spray paint on canvas, 2015 18-2015 36x36, oil & spray paint on canvas, 2015 17-2015 36x36, oil & spray paint on canvas, 2015 16-2015 36x36, oil & spray paint on canvas, 2015 1/2

  • CITIZEN PARTICIPATION | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... CITIZEN PARTICIPATION: DIAGRAMS & DIRECTIVES ​ FEMINIST ART GROUP (IV Castellanos, Amanda Hunt, Nina Isabelle & Thea Little) ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space 292 E. 3rd St. NYC May 6, 2018 ​ Organized by Esther Neff & Steven Englander ​ Feminist Art Group Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff Feminist Art Group / Thea Little Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff Feminist Art Group Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff Feminist Art Group Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff Feminist Art Group / Thea Little Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff Feminist Art Group / Nina Isabelle Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff Feminist Art Group Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff Feminist Art Group / Amanda Hunt Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff Feminist Art Group Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff Feminist Art Group Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff Feminist Art Group / IV Castellanos Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff Feminist Art Group Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff Feminist Art Group Citizen Participation : Diagrams & Directives / ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space / photos by Esther Neff

  • SAN DIEGO ART INSTITUTE | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... MOTHER VS GOD A short creepy video by Nina Isabelle ​ September 28, 2016 ​ The Dead Are Not Quiet was organized by Scott Mitchell Putesky, an artist and musician best known for his work as the guitarist and co-founder of the musical group Marilyn Manson. the exhibition will run concurrently with “The Haunted Art of T. Jefferson Carey. Exhibiting Artists in The Dead Are Not Quiet include Addison Stonestreet, Alex Ingram, Alison Chen & Michael Covello, Anne Pelej, Cayce Wheelock, Clayton Llewellyn, Dakota Noot, Dan Adams, Daniel Corona, David Russell Talbott, Emily Hastings, Eric Potts, Garrett Wear, Hannah Johansen, Hugh Schock, Ivy Guild, Janice Grinsell, Jenya Armen, John Purlia, John Straub, Julia Oldham, Karim Shuquem, Kurosh Yahyai, Larry Caveney, Liza Hennessey Botkin, Lucas Novak, Maidy Morhous, Michelle Mueller + Erik Mueller, Natalie Meredith, Nathaniel Clark, Nina Isabelle, PANCA, Paul Koester, Philip Petrie, Rita Miglioli, Robin Spalding, Shahla Rose, Sheena Rae Dowling, Wick Alexander, and Yvette Jackson.

  • HiLo Catskill / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... Nina Isabelle Opening at HiLo CATSKILL, NY ​ MAY 2017 Nina Isabelle, with her signature gusto, will be presenting an evening of intrigue, education, and hullabaloo. Arm wrestling, The Overconfident Autodidact (performed by Erik Hokanson,) a tea party performance by Valerie Sharp, a public interview with the questioner another performance artist (Matthew Gioia,) and two documentary screenings- The Eucharist Machine and Time Travel Research Documentary.. Nina Isabelle's installation will be at HiLo from now until June 5. It can be viewed M-F 7am-2pm and Sat & Sun 9am - 4pm until May 3rd after which time the hours will be M-Tu 7-2, W-Th 7 -4, Fri 7am-12am, Sat 7-12am, Sun 9am - 10pm Out of gallery

  • BEAST CONJURING | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... BEAST CONJURING at Paul McMahon's ​ MOTHERSHIP Woodstock, NY January 16-21, 2018 ​ L orene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, & Jennifer Zackin On January 21, 2018 performers at Paul McMahon's Mothership in Woodstock, NY work to conjure the sea beast from the book of Revelation. ​ The "Beast Conjuring" performance intended to conjure and kill the sea beast from the book of Revelation. A group of artists and performers were invited to simultaneously interweave their own processes and intentions as a way to generate energies that might be focused toward the common goal of beast conjuring. Together the group worked to build and maximizing the physical, sensory, and psychic spaces that bind the internal and external dimensions of awareness through performative modes of sound making, movement, object construction, and ceremonial-like gestures in a process that became an inquiry into how a metaphoric conjure-and-kill scenario might translate or become useful in a literal dimension where such things are less possible-seeming. ​ "Beast Conjuring" was performed within an installation including ten hand-fabricated crowns, ten cedar root horns dug from local woods, hand painted imagery of the seven-headed ten-horned beast, a suspended hand-sewn white linen angel, a reconstructed domestic scene from the home of an ex-evangelical and a giant edible Whore of Babylon cake as bait. Lorene Bouboushian read personal text and improvised sound and movement, Linda Mary Montano performed a holy water blessing as Chicken Linda, Brian McCorkle produced sound using a Saxophone and his specially designed Beast Box, (a noise machine built with raspberry-pi based software that cast neural nets for soul retrieval,) Jennifer Zackin engaged in a task-based performance to weave a beast trapping vortex, Ever Peacock and I performed an acoustic rendition of Larry Norman's *You've been Left Behind* thirteen consecutive times all awash in Miles Pflanz's video remake of the 2014 American Christian apocalyptic thriller film *Left Behind* (based on the bestselling novels by Tim Lahaye and Jerry B. Jenkins) that reframes durational performance art as post-apocalyptic living. ​ It's difficult to gauge the effectiveness of a performance conglomerate like "Beast Conjuring" due to its potential to be made to mean multiple things by participants and observers and the ripples of their combined experiences and energies. At the same time, the ability of a situation to evade meaning is exciting. No literal beast popped out of the floor, no politicians were struck dead and there weren't any recognizable or even loosely associated repercussive events of cosmic significance but the usefulness and appeal of such a process seems to unfurl over time in a circular and translucent way that generates unanswerable questions and hints at the possibilities and potential of less realistic thinking and doing. Beast Conjuring at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Lorene, Nina, & Jen Zackin The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Beast Conjuring KILL Paper Collage 22x30 (rubberized paint, gouache, ash, enamel, watercolor) By Nina Isabelle Miles Pflanz at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Brian McCorkle, Nina Isabelle The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia The Beast at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership7509 The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia NAI_7452 Nina Isabelle, Ever Peacock The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia The Beast at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Linda Mary Montano in Beast Conjurin The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Ever Peacock at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia The Beast at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Linda Mary Montano The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Jennifer Zackin, Lorene Bouboushian The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Linda Mary Montano at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Jennifer Zackin, Lorene Bouboushian The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle, Lorene Bouboushian The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Lorene Bouboushian at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Lorene Bouboushian at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Lorene & Nina at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Lorene Bouboushian at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Brian McCorkle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle and Lorene Bouboushian The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Bouboushian, Isabelle, Peacock The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle at The Mothership The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia Nina Isabelle and Paul McMahon The Beast at Mothership Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Miles Pflanz, and Jennifer Zackin. Photo by Amelia Iaia

  • MUSCULAR BONDING DOCUMENTS | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... MUSCULAR BONDING-PHOTO DOCUMENTS Adriana Disman, Nina Isabelle, Kaia Gilje, Beth Neff, Esther Neff, Edward Sharp M.A.R.S.H, St. Louis / Living Arts, Tulsa, OK ​ February 15 - March 5, 2018 ​ We traveled, lived, worked, and performed together for three weeks as a performance experiment conceived, initiated, and enforced by Esther Neff. On February 15, 2018 we drove from Panoply Performance Lab in Brooklyn, NY to M.A.R.S.H (Materializing & Activating Radical Social Habitus) in St. Louis, MO. We lived, worked, and ate together under strict and extreme circumstances, and then performed actions that were devised through collective manipulation to "materialize participant's structural realities" at The New Genre Art Festival at Living Arts Tulsa. ​ ​ ​ Kaia Gilje & Adriana Disman carry a sheet of dry wall up a staircase at M.A.R.S.H. (Materializing & Activating Radical Social Habitus) in St. Louis, MO. Photo: Nina Isabelle Out of gallery

  • TEN THOUSAND OBJECTIVES | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... TEN THOUSAND OBJECTIVES Out of gallery I was interested in trying to figure out how the body knows what it knows — specifically, the somatic experience of tangible material, the cognitive experience of intangible concepts, and the interplay between these four variables. I was also interested in how repetition seems to create the potential to sidestep consciousness, and I wanted to experiment with that notion to see if I could access different modes of perception or ways of knowing by engaging in a repetitive action for an extended length of time. In setting up the framework for this performance, I mapped out and identified all the parameters that I was able to. I decided on the timeframe and squared off the surface area of my work space. This gave me a way to control the tangible aspects of the performance. By laying out this semi-structured plan, I hoped to create a situation where intangibles and surprises could occur. Starting in the middle of an eighteen foot square of floor space, I set out to make one thousand pinch pots within a span of four hours. I imagined the pots would fill the entire work space and somehow be equally distributed. I counted the pots as I went along and kept track of them in ten groups of ten — something I realized was necessary as I went along and realized would be the only way for me to know when I was done. I was surprised to find that, at the end of the four hours, and down to within a few minutes, I had made the exact amount I set out to make. While I was working, the span of four hours seemed to shrink down to about the feeling of twenty minutes. These are the types of perceptive phenomena I’m interested in working with and demonstrating. How did these things happen so exactly with such little planning? How and why does time seem to stretch or contract depending on levels of engagement, intention, and focus? ​ Things can be objects or subjects. While objects are tangible things abstracted from the particularness of subjects, subjects are the intangible concepts or notions we extract from objects. How do we process the intangible sense data we extract from encountering objects made of particles in the physical dimension and what do we call this process? What are the internal mechanisms we use to govern how we locate and position our physical selves in relation to objects in space? ​ For this project, I constructed and deconstructed a batch of 10,000 intangible and tangible subjects and objects as a way to set both their physical and nonmaterial aspects free. Through forming a set of 1,000 physical objects made of clay with my hands, the conceptual intangibleness of their essence was simultaneously set free and bound as it transformed into material form. Conversely, intangible concepts were released from physicality through the gestural motions accompanied by the transmutation of 9,000 subjects into nonmaterial objects. Equinox: EMERGENCY OF JOY - 10,000 THINGS SET FREE ​ Seventy one artists from around the world work together remotely and simultaneously over the spring Equinox. Organized by Chelsea Burton, Rae Diamond, Erik Ehn, Brenda Hutchinson, Suki O’Kane, “Ten thousand is rooted in the Buddhist concept of the ten thousand dharmas – an image for all observable reality." ​ MARCH 19, 2020 11:49 PM EST - MARCH 20, 2020 1:49 AM EST (Equinox at 11:49 PM EST) ​

  • SILVER GELATIN PRINTS (1989-1999) | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... SILVER GELATIN PRINTS 1989-1999 A Collection of gelatin silver prints made from photograms, handmade negatives, and experimental darkroom photographic processes. Mother Selenium toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print Selenium toned silver gelatin print 7x9 toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print Selenium toned silver gelatin print 7x9 toned silver gelatin print prismacolor on toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print sepia toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print toned silver gelatin print Selenium toned silver gelatin print 7x9 1/1

  • 650 ml. OF LUNG PUSS | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... 650 ML. OF LUNG PUSS A seventeen-day artlife performance at Westchester Medical Center's Maria Fareri Children's Hospital in Valhalla, NY December 18, 2019 - January 3, 2020 650 ml. of Lung Puss was a seventeen-day performance initiated by a dire circumstance that ultimately demonstrated a quantum aspect of artlife processes. Influenced by my friend and artlife colleague Linda Mary Montano, the performance inspired a deeper understanding of a performance process that summons elemental energies from a nonlocational power source. These energies exist in a state of quantum superposition and can be programmed using intention, determination, focus, and sacrifice, to transmute pain, suffering, and trauma into tolerance, endurance, resilience, self awareness, control, forgiveness, grace, and gratitude. The performance began on December 18th when I carried my near lifeless and blue 94lb. daughter across a large, dark, silent, windy, and cold parking lot into the hospital's emergency room. The energies that fueled this difficult task were conjured from a deeply derived performative physical power cultivated by all mothers collectively throughout eternal time combined with the tension building from a deadlocked schism between my intuition and the medical authorities. In the past two days, we had been sent home from the emergency room and a pediatrician's office. Meanwhile, my daughter had developed sepsis from Scarlett Fever, Pneumonia, and a pleural effusion in her left lung. Our hospital performance engaged members of our close community, artlife collaborators and colleagues, friends and family, and the larger medical community of ambulance drivers, EMTs, emergency room attendants, nurses,doctors, phlebotomists, surgeons, lab and x-ray technicians, infectious disease specialists, sanitation specialists, medical administrators, and so on. Together, we collectively transformed into an unintentional ensemble performing actions together as our best selves in order to save a child's life. We embodied multiple and often simultaneous roles and embraced the fluctuating spaces between these modes. We performed as mothers, organizers, brothers, partners, distractors, whisperers of encouragement, visitors, tear swallowers, fear fighters, candle lighters, gift givers, keepers of tempers, story book readers, temperature takers, practitioners of patience, hand holders, phone callers, researchers, organizers, group texters, medicine givers, vomit bucket holders, comforters, food providers, errand runners, and healers. On the final day of our hospital performance, Linda texted "rest art!!!" to our group. We were finally able to go home, perform rest, and RESTART. This performance demonstrated that art and life function as entangled dimensions through subtle quantum artlife processes. We learned that approaches effective in art and performance dimensions are also effective in dimensions of life and other realities, and that intentions and actions occurring within one dimension simultaneously reflect, impact, and are made evident in multiple ways throughout multiple dimensions. Engaging with life circumstances through performative art mechanisms allows us to translate the diverse array of creative skills derived from our disciplined artlife practices, (our responsive, intuitive, reflexive, mindful, and conceptual abilities,) into cognitive modes of awareness that inform the new life patterns necessary to thrive as artists in life. Through this post-conceptualizing processes, we gain the ability to sidestep linear chronologies and reframe the concepts of our engagements post-performatively as a way to articulate with the personal mechanisms of awareness and control necessary to make meanings and choices that fortify our collective artlives in new and beneficial ways. List of Performers: Paul DeVincent, Ernest Goodmaw, Sylvia Hallibelle, Chris Hallman, Erik Hokanson, Eric Hurliman, Ulysses Hurliman, Bg Isabelle, Ed Isabelle, Kate Isabelle, Lou Isabelle, Louie Isabelle-DeVincent, Margie Isabelle, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Jill McDermid, Paul McMahon, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Mor Pipman, Valerie Sharp, Maureen Sharp, Luke Stence, Jennifer Zackin, and Havarah Zawaluk, many anonymous medical professionals, hospital workers, elementary school teachers, school nurses, community mothers and children.

  • BLACK BEDROOM | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE BEDROOM 4th Iteration ​ THE HOLLAND TUNNEL GALLERY Brooklyn, NY October 20 - November 12 The Bedroom is an international monochromatic flux installation by The Women Artist Team. The 3rd Iteration was exhibited at NA Gallery in Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea. ​

  • FEEDING THE ENTITY | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... FEEDING THE ENTITY MARCH 2015 Clara Diamond & Nina Isabelle Feeding The Entity explores the development and agenda of interwoven notions of communal beliefs, material dynamics, possibilities of non-linear physical travel implied through numbers expressing location using longitude and latitude, the metaphor of breath in relation to inspiration and language styles expressing give-and-take or push/pull communication patterns, the articulation of verbal concepts in relation to the movement between ball-and-socket joints such as the hips and shoulders during the birthing-process, as well as the documentation of scientifically unsubstantiated effects of focused intention and ritual action in non-physical reality such as memory, deja-vu, and other phenomena of psychic imprint.

  • THE EUCHARIST MACHINE / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE EUCHARIST MACHINE BANGKOK UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL BANGKOK, THAILAND / MARCH , 2017 English with Thai subtitles Thai with English subtitles Inspired by Chris Lehmann’s book The Money Cult: Capitalism, Christianity, and the Unmaking of The American Dream, The Eucharist Machine addresses language, perception, and belief. In The Eucharist Machine, information is skewed by a presentation of jumbled non-linear facts and fiction, science, pseudoscience, and science fiction. Inaccurate grammar and linguistics push the concept even further by incorporating the cockamayme Thai / English subtitles and voice-overs produced by Google Translate and Apple’s Text To Speech system preference in a process that reverse-legitimizes the information. The Eucharist Machine is what happens when the under informed articulate with high-tech features. Information lost in translation becomes a sort of up-cycled spirituality; a futuristic projection of possible renewal of the crumbling dialogue between spirituality, commodity, and financial value. The Eucharist Machine takes a serious, culturally backwards, multigenerational look at what it means to be sanctified. เครื่องศีลมหาสนิทเป็นหนังสั้นที่เขียนกำกับและแก้ไขโดยศิลปินนานาชาติ Nina อิสซาเบล แรงบันดาลใจจากหนังสือของคริสมาห์ของเงินลัทธิ: ทุนนิยมคริสต์และ Unmaking ของความฝันอเมริกันภาษาอยู่เครื่องศีลมหาสนิทการรับรู้และความเชื่อ ในศีลมหาสนิทเครื่องข้อมูลจะถูกบิดเบือนโดยการนำเสนอข้อเท็จจริงที่คลั่งไคล้ที่ไม่ใช่เชิงเส้นและนิยายวิทยาศาสตร์ pseudoscience และนิยายวิทยาศาสตร์ ไวยากรณ์ไม่ถูกต้องและภาษาศาสตร์ผลักดันแนวคิดให้ดียิ่งขึ้นโดยผสมผสาน cockamayme คำบรรยายภาษาไทย / ภาษาอังกฤษและเสียงพากย์ผลิตโดย Google Translate และข้อความของ Apple เพื่อการตั้งค่าระบบเสียงพูดในกระบวนการที่ย้อนกลับ legitimizes ข้อมูล เครื่องศีลมหาสนิทเป็นสิ่งที่เกิดขึ้นเมื่ออยู่ภายใต้แจ้งปล้องที่มีคุณสมบัติที่มีเทคโนโลยีสูง ข้อมูล Lost in Translation กลายเป็นจัดเรียงของขึ้นกรณืจิตวิญญาณ; การฉายอนาคตของการต่ออายุเป็นไปได้ของการเจรจาบี้ระหว่างจิตวิญญาณสินค้าโภคภัณฑ์และความคุ้มค่าทางการเงิน ศีลมหาสนิทเครื่องยิงร้ายแรงวัฒนธรรมย้อนหลังดูหลายรุ่นว่ามันหมายถึงความบริสุทธิ์

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Multidisciplinary Artist // CODE

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... C O D E February 22, 2016 In response to Apple’s battle with the FBI over a federal order to unlock the iPhone of a mass shooter, C O D E looks at the differences between humans and machines and the difference between how these systems reveal or encrypt data through programming and intention. ​

  • ILLUMINATING INTANGIBLES | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ILLUMINATING INTANGIBLES Performance by Nina Isabelle & Amelia Iaia at Para\\el Performance Space in Brooklyn, NY on March 23, 2019 Out of gallery English fails at describing the location of abstractions in relation to the human body. Identifying such things is challenging and understanding our proximities to both physical and abstract structures or concepts is a murky smudge in our perceptive fields and abilities. Recognizing how perceptions transition from one "place" to another requires a deep inquiry into the question of how we arrive at sensing or knowing. Prepositions are words that describe the location of things in relation to other things. The English language has more than a million words to describe subjects and objects yet only 150 prepositions. Prepositions are useful for describing the location of physical objects yet fail when put up against or in combination with abstract subjects. Amelia and I generated a random list of prepositions paired with abstract nouns and verbs and came up with one-hundred-and-fifty phrases that we used to produce an audio arrangement. We constructed interactive objects of materials consisting of various textures, densities, and transparency for our performance. We came up with a set of gestures that we felt illustrated the concept as a way to illuminate the intangibleness of our language and perception situation.

  • ACTIVATING PERCEPTION | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ACTIVATING PERCEPTION - NINA A. ISABELLE MIDTOWN ARTS DISTRICT by Debra Bresnan May 10, 2017 ​ https://madkingston.org/2017/05/09/nina-a-isabelle/ ​ When did you first know you were an artist? Growing up people referred to me as an artist and so I became one – an experience that made me aware of the power of language, perception, belief, and social programming, all themes in my current work. It’s possible that if I had grown up in a different environment I might have been an engineer because as an artist I’m always working with how things like concepts of memory and phenomena articulate with visual and spatial perception, language, materials, and meaning and how to build generative dialogue between these factors. Where an engineer might work with materials, data, or electricity, as an artist I use a similar approach but with different variables. ​ Favorite medium(s) you use to make art? My favorite art medium is probably the phenomena of perception and how language builds reality. Right now my focus is on working to manipulate and bend notions surrounding the value and usefulness of art away from commodity and towards structures that represent essential and social value. Inside of this, working with painting I can still have an intention to study gesture, motion, and look for new languages that might emerge from this action and mark making or find new information in whatever emerges. I like to get my hands on chunks of materials like vats of clay, lumber, bolts of fabric, or discarded machine parts and sort of grapple with the stuff until it gives in to another form. Sometimes I might start out with an intention or give myself an assignment, but other times I let myself generate information by engaging with materials and paying close attention as I go. ​ Since I work pretty equally with photography, video, design, performance, installation, and painting, nothing is really off limits to me. I grew up at a summer camp for kids where we had an arts and crafts department with a ceramics studio, photo lab, leather tools, batik, enamels, silk screens, and fabric dye, among others. Nine months out of the year these departments were vacant and I really made the best of it – I learned to use the kiln and glazes by haphazardly blowing up and melting a lot of stuff, mixing chemistry by taste, a lot of other experimental and dangerous learning-by-doing that has carried over to my current approach. I never read instructions as a younger person because I couldn’t really read until I went to college. I’m rarely intimidated by new things, and I think that’s one of my favorite things about my development and approach. What are the most interesting new trends in your field? Is your work changing as a result? One of the most exciting things I notice right now is a shift toward recognizing the social value of art as a tool to reframe reality through community building, open sourcing ideas and data, and through things like artist collectives and working together with other artists and community members. In the art world, there are always these superficial fads like geometric shapes or graffiti, or some new trendy material, or something everyone is doing like such-and-such, but my work doesn’t usually wind up aligning itself with those sorts of cultural flows. I don’t usually find myself in trendy circles — something that has made it difficult to find a community but also has led me to the point where I am now. I recognize that, all along, my running mission has been to challenge outmoded institutional and economic systems that have grown regulated and insular and to work to build systems to replace these. Artists are always pressing hard against hierarchal structures like gender, race, and social class: It seems like the discord generated by our new political administration is influencing a lot of art thinking these days. ​ Talk about your creative process ­– where/when do you get most of your ideas and how do you know a piece is ‘finished’? My creative process is rooted pretty firmly in letting myself respond instinctively. One thing I often find myself doing is trying to destroy rosy notions that abound around creativity being “beautiful.” Being a person who has given birth to babies I recognize the mess, blood, and pain that goes along with creativity. I have a lot of ideas and mostly I choose to go with the ones that make me laugh about myself or our collective idiocy. I also like to work with themes that irk me such as fake systems of legitimization we use to determine success, such as university degrees, financial values and the gender and power imbalances that seem to perpetually skew the art world. ​ Making art objects like paintings and sculptures, and grappling with material and concepts together, I’ve questioned the point of it beyond decoration or commodity and have come to understand my process as a personal tool that lets me understand reality in a way that I can integrate. Working with materials and visual information puts me in touch with deeper threads of meaning, and nuances of life that fortify the tapestry. I’m drawn toward this way of working and thinking because there seems to be something I can’t quite say in writing or speaking, something linear language can’t quite get at. I don’t know what it is yet and that’s what keeps me engaged. ​ As far as recognizing when something is finished, I think it’s just a matter of paying attention to a subtle feeling of “doneness,” or arriving at a comfortable stopping point or a feeling of resolve – like I’ve figured something out or said what I meant to say. Sometimes a stopping point might never come because maybe I’ve gone down on a dead-end path. I have a lot of projects in limbo because they’ve become overwhelming or I’ve lost interest, things I can always get back to at any point. And, in a quantum way, things can never be finished because time isn’t linear and there’s no such thing as an end point. ​ Do you also teach or are you strictly a creative artist? Who was your most influential mentor and why? How do you see the role of being a mentor? and why? In the past, I’ve taught art classes like photography, modern dance, and painting or movement workshops. There is always a technical entry point where students spend time learning about say, the camera machine, visual mechanics, basic movement patterns, or just becoming familiar with materials, and this can be a fun and engaging way for people to come together. But I always want to move further into dialogue about how the usefulness of these art tools and practices can be more than a fun pastime or therapeutic hobby. Art offers invaluable ways to shift perception and find new vantage points. As an artist, I collaborate with others in several capacities that seem more like mutual mentorship, where we share and build upon each other’s momentum and concepts. I’m not sure that I’ve ever fit the part of strictly a mentor to another, but I do recognize people who’ve inspired me. I had a couple high school teachers who helped me to evade attendance, something that in a typical case might not sound helpful, but I really recognize and value people who have taken risks in order to do the right thing morally. School is not a good place for all children. ​ I can’t say that I’ve ever had a strong relationship with an individual mentor, but something that intrigued me early on was finding and building obscure relationships between seemingly unrelated artists and their work. I remember wondering about Käthe Kollwitz’s Woman With Dead Child in relationship to Henry Moore’s sculptures and sheep sketchbook, and Jim Dine’s Robes. Somehow the similar volume expressed in these works was curious to me, possibly as a subconscious desire to connect the physical form of my body to their work because I’ve always been athletic. I was also intrigued by industrial design and how humans interact with tools and objects, especially mid-century chairs like the Eames Lounger and Bertoia’s designs as a framework for simultaneously supporting physical and thought forms together. So in a way, I’ve let this sense of wonder guide me. What are you working on now? For the past year, I’ve been working on a project called The Superfund Re-Visioning Project . It’s an experimental framework that aims to transform contaminated industrial sites recognized by The United States Government as Superfund Sites. In New York State there are 117 of these sites. I’m developing a project that aims to create a platform for artists and community members who might otherwise be marginalized by political and financial systems that typically deal with these sorts of remediation. ​ I’m also involved with an artist collective developed by IV Castellanos called The Feminist Art Group (F.A.G.) from Brooklyn, and plan to invite them to Kingston this summer for one of The Shirt Factory Open Studio events. Currently, I have a show at the new HiLo gallery space in Catskill and like to participate in local shows at The Old Glenford Church Studio . I think it’s great when things like The UNITY show curated by Sarah Carlson and Lisa Barnard Kelley between the artists at The Shirt Factory and The Lace Mill come together to fortify community connectedness. Upcoming, I have work being featured by The Unstitute in Catalunya, Spain and plan to do something fun at Paul McMahon’s Mothership Gallery this fall. Recently my focus is moving into sound and auditory perception. I’ve become interested in digitally degraded sound snippets and obscuring auditory input to the point of noise in a way to find out what’s behind and within the experience of sound. ​ For more information about my work and listings of recent/current exhibitions, projects and collaborations, please visit www.ninaisabelle.com/cv . ​ How has being in Kingston enhanced/inspired your work? What do you like best about living in Kingston/being involved with MAD? How long have you been here? Kingston has a lot to offer artists and community members and is building momentum as an arts-branded district. Recently we’ve seen several exciting places pop up like David Schell’s Green Kill , Rilley Johndonnell’s Optimism concept, Broadway Arts , The Art/Life Institute on Abeel Street , and Kingston High School Art teacher Lara Giordano, who is exhibiting student work at PUGG on Broadway. The surrounding landscape is diverse and inspiring conceptually because of the Hudson River waterways, The Catskill Mountains, The Ashokan Reservoir, and the surrounding forests, hiking, and rail trails. The Mid-Hudson Library system is phenomenal, and it’s easy to travel back and forth to New York City from Kingston. It’s great to have artist studio spaces like The Shirt Factory and The Lace Mill which offer affordable living spaces for artists, and especially new organizations like MAD that are forming to support this new movement. ​

  • YARD WORK / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... YARD WORK (YARD STUDIO) HURLEY, NY / MAY 2017 Out of gallery

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Multidisciplinary Artist // Windmill Weapon

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE WINDMILL WEAPON MATRON MAY 2016 ​ ​ The Windmill Weapon Matron was built on May 12, 2016 and exhibited on June 3, 2016 as part of The New School's Social Justice exhibition with The Bushwick Collective. Materials include s awhorse, l umber, co nstruction m aterials, s pray p aint, h ouse p aint, a fghans, w eapons, b icycle p arts, y arn, p laster, t erra c otta, c hain. She is 90h x 53w x 45d. ​ She is a dangerous female machine expressing an active stance and aggressive posture. She no longer identifies as passive and has most recently emerged as an international threat. Based on a jumbled compilation of afghans, defunct bicycle parts, weapons, lumber, and chain her biographical narrative has been holographically reconfigured into a destructive biological machine made of woman’s time. While The Windmill Weapon Matron acknowledges her destructive approach as a natural response to her capacity for childbirth, she hesitates to dichotomize the two simply saying “Come, let me destroy you.” Utilizing a process of defiance The Windmill Weapon Matron has successfully developed a system capable of transforming eye-rolling, financial aid application trauma, stuffed animal over population, and hair pulling as well as other sensory input bull shit into a clean, renewable, and sustainable energy source for mothers. ​ ​ Nobody will lend her a chainsaw It is safe to breed with her She makes a mockery of science Her system is nervous ​ Her face is spinning When she was a virgin politicians killed and ate her She is secular Her system has calcified ​ She loves The Antichrist She birthed a female bastard She wan’t trained up the way she should go The system tries to destroy her ​ She has nothing to depart from Rabbits fear her She has been relieved of advantage Her system is unkillable ​ ​ ​ ​

  • BANGKOK UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... BANGKOK UNDERGROUND CINEMA ​ The Bangkok Underground Film Festival 2017 program consists of a series of events across multiple venues in Bangkok. Co-organised by Speedy Grandma , emesis , Bridge Art Space & Jam Caf é , with support from VS Service , Projectionist Asia , Panda Records and Museum Siam . ​ MARCH 5-12, 2017

N I N A  A. I S A B E L L E